Intermediate · Modern Recreationist · Modern Recreationist Intermediate

Æva Dyer

Location: Barony of Caerthe, Outlands

Category/Level: Modern Recreationist/Intermediate

Project Update Blog: Of Green and Gold

About Æva: I have been playing in the SCA for just about 4 years now. Sewing wise my mother taught me as a child and I have continued on making Halloween Costumes, Cosplay, and now historical garments. My recent sewing has been keeping my child in garb, and finishing off leftover projects from college… I sew often but finishing things is a weak point. I usually play 10th Century Anglo Saxon this is a huge challenge for me as we go from clever triangles and rectangles to curves and yards upon yards of fabric. The first dress I was given help from the lovely The Honorable Lady Isabelle de Calais, as she created a first draft of the bodice based on her own. I also referenced much of her work as I rushed to complete the dress in under a week. When I am not sewing I am playing with illumination and other fiber arts.

Her Project: The plan is to remake a noble woman’s 1560’s Venetian dress. I had made one for our Baronial 12th night this past year. However, the dress needs to be reworked and I would like to see a more complete outfit. If you have seen the Venetian Province of Treviso, Republic of Venice Paolo Caliari (Veronese), 1561: Detail from fresco Treviso, Villa Barbaro That is basically the color and cut of the dress I plan to make. However, this piece will be more Modern Recreationist as I do not have the knowledge or skill to bring this to a Historically Focused masterpiece. Why? I honestly fell in love with this dress! It is comfy yet elegant and I would like to do it justice not just leave it as a one-off. The Layers I plan to make a set of Drawers, fix the Camicia neckline, cut a new bodice to correct the errors I made on the first dress, re-do the pleats on the skirt properly and attach to the bodice, make a Partlet, make a pair of sleeves, making a zimarra, make a zibellini. I plan to hand sew, a number of pieces but because of the time limit will be using machine stitching as needed. I will also attempt to document my progress via my blog ofgreenandgold.com

Layer 1

Drawers- 16th Century Italy lady. Drawers have been documented by Janet Arnold and extent pieces exist. I made these based off a tutorial by Maestrina Chiaretta di Fiore (www.kitsclothingcollection.com) using the Bara Method outlined by the Modern Maker. I started by making a custom pattern based on the tutorial. First I made a set of Bara tapes. From there I drew the pattern out on paper before cutting some duckybunny to make a mockup. However once sewn up I found that the gusset was not needed as the inseam was long enough. Once the gusset was removed and the mockup resewn I ran about a bit to make sure I would not split them. Satisfied that the drawers fit I cut the final pair in a heavy linen. I also cut a cuff to finish the bottom. I machine stitched the main seams but chose to finish the front and back by hand to prevent fraying. I pressed the cuff in 4ths and used tacking stitch to attach them to the leg. I used the machine to top stitch them on. I folded the top over an inch to make a casing for the drawstring.

The drawstring I made using wool yarn I had dyed prior to this challenge with marigold and a lucet. The lucet was a new skill for me as I hadn’t owned one prior to this year and my last attempt with a borrowed one ended in a mess. Once I figured it out I made a length to use.

Over all I am pleased with making a working pair of pants. Pants are my nemesis and I haven’t made a working pair until now. The drawers are very comfy and I look forward to wearing them to events over my usual leggings.

Bonus Points

Advanced · Modern Advanced · Modern Recreationist

Akilina Ianikitova

Location: Barony of al-Barran, Outlands

Category/Level: Modern Recreationist, Advanced

About Akilina : I’ve been in the SCA for 13 years. I sew, lampwork, throw pottery, cook, metalwork, and am picking up new hobbies all the time. I focus exclusively on kievan Rus’ for myself but do many other areas for folks I sew for. I’ve done stamping before but I still consider myself a novice at it.

Her Project: My goal is to do an early 13th century Kievan rus’ aristocrat ‘Slytherin’ ensemble.

Final Photo

Her final thoughts on her C3 experience:

I really enjoyed this challenge. It really motivated me to get back into crafting after a fairly long slump and it was amazing so see all of the creative things everyone else made.

Layer 1

The ciasnoche (translated literally as ‘tight’) is a garment worn in early medieval Poland (Kievan Rus’ ruled slavic tribes) and surrounding areas. It was worn all the way up to modern day. One from the 1950’s, virtually unchanged from Viking age construction, is on display at the Seweryn Udziela Ethnographic Museum in Krakow. Despite that fact, there is very limited information on them. Especially in English. It is said to be an undergarments’, sometimes worn solo by female field workers during the hot summer, but, especially after making it and wearing it, I am convince it was a bathing garment that was also worn in the field. It is not supportive, nor does it give structure to outer garments. I was working off of a very bad translation, a reproduction of a miniature and one bespoke garment. If I did it again, which I will, I’ll follow the pictures that I recently found and have the gathers only in the back and sides.

Layer 2

My second layer is a fairly simple underdress using a rectangular construction pattern with a keyhole neckline based off of different illuminations found in churches and in texts. While there is no verified proof that this construction was used (extant fabric finds are often incomplete) we do have extant contemporary Middle Eastern patterns that follow rectangular construction. Knowing what we know now about medieval travel and the range of the Byzantine empire, the use of the pattern is plausible. This dress is made out of silver silk and a synthetic brocade, based off of a Scandinavian find, adorns the cuffs. All layers are hand finished hems, cuffs and neck lines though the seams are machine sewn. It was supposed to have a border at the base of the same brocade but I opted out for several reasons. Mostly I’m not particularly thrilled with the cut. Due to fabric widths I had to get a little creative. So I’ll be saving the brocade for a better fitting project.

Layer 3

Layer 3 is my super Slytherin Letnik. Characterized by its wide sleeves, it is an incredibly common garment to see in period rus’ illustrations from the 9th to 13th century. This one is made out of shot green silk dupioni which has been elaborately stamped with modified motifs from the period hand carved by a friend in silver and black. I’m still getting the handle of stamping, especially with larger stamps so its a little spotty in some areas but overall, the look is pretty impressive. The hem, neck and sleeves are edged with the same silk as the underdress, stamped in green. Everything is hand done except for the internal seams. This garment would definitely be for nobles but because it is stamped instead of brocade, it could be argued its for lower class nobles. Side note, it sounds like wrapping paper when you move in it. There is also the temple band that the temple rings are attached to for this layer. It is constructed using elements from all other layer and is entirely hand sewn.

Layer 4

I wanted to really go out on a limb with my accessory, but I just love temple rings too much. This temple ring design is based off of a redrawing from an extant find in the Novgorod-Slovene area, known for their large hoops and simple dangles. This pair is made out of sterling silver and silver plate. All elements are made by me with the exception of actually drawing the plate and wire from an ingot and the ‘bell’. Modern tools were used for construction but some of the tools, such as the stamps, were hand made. Medieval bells are surprisingly difficult to source so in lieu of one I actually used a silver slavic button. It looks astonishingly correct and these temple rings jingle enough without having a bell added. The tinkling noise they make from the silver pieces is actually rather nice.

Bonus Points

Intermediate · Modern Recreationist · Modern Recreationist Intermediate

Ambra Michelli

Location: Trimaris

Category/Level: Modern Recreationist/Intermediate

About Ambra: My first event was in the womb. In that time, I have learned to make sturdy lasting garb – but have opportunities to grow my quality and aesthetic. I am very excited for this challenge. In 2017, I was elevated to the order of the Laurel for my efforts in Written Works and the bardic community, and due service to my kingdom. I come from the shiny days of firelight catching trim, and am looking to step into something more authentic (while maintaining the convenience of my sewing machine – better for my attention span…). I actually have an Italian persona, but my household is Norse, linen breaths, and Trimaris is hot! This will be the perfect wander-by-night Gulf Wars outfit. Ideally.

Her Project: I plan to make a late Norse outfit – under-shift, apron, coat, and accessory. The coat especially is something I have wanted to make for some time. It may include some heraldry. I have not yet decided. It will be based on some historical examples and altered for my personal aesthetic.

Final Photos

Her Final thoughts on her C3 experience:

I’m so very grateful to the Volunteers who ran this competition. I rarely put this much effort into my own carb and this was a joy And a bit of a learning experience. Very excited and looking forward to many more projects that this has inspired.

Layer 1

Beaded and hand embroidered felt applique sleeves – underdress. Turned yolk w machine embroidery and trim. Machine embroidered seams. 
I am hard on my sleeves so did not edge embroider and the overdress will be elongated so no btm adornment would be visible. 

Layer 2

This second layer is a viking Norse Overdressed . It made out of hand-woven light Wool from Afghanistan . The And our roles and I added a bit of trim. In retrospect I don’t like that addition and will remove the trim, but for the purpose of this competition It fits as embroidery a dormant. One final note, normally I embroider the seams however I am going through a weight transition and if I were to add gores it would ruin the dress given the delicate nature of the fabric so I decided not to. The lay of the fabric is lovely And the feel even more so. I love the way this turned out. The straps are attached in the back for convenience but Loose in the front as they would have been And penned to fit . The seams are all Surge and or rolled depending . And the Rocks themselves or the wool fabric Tubed And flipped and then some down.

Layer 3

This Overcoat was an exciting project. The fabric looks well but I think has a little plastic in it I just a little rough on the fingers . It doesn’t feel synthetic but it’s not Soft to the touch. Or scratching the way will can be. So I faced/lined it with a linen canvas Which makes it feel really good against Your skin where it touches . I flipped the sleeves so the edges wouldn’t irritate my wrists And Trimmed around the sleeve matching the bordering trim Of the open neck. I also added some Byzantine trim to the bottom Which was more complicated than I assumed given its thickness. I also use an embroidery pattern Documentable for the Era Down the seams .

Layer 4

The last layer was an accessory. I thought about doing a headdress but in the end decided this outfit needed jewelry. So I created three strands of beads , Careful to ensure they reflected the color scheme, but also contrasted against the brown of the Overdress. I used Norse brooches that I already had To complete the outfit . I’m very happy with this layer’s result.

Bonus Points

Intermediate · Modern Recreationist · Modern Recreationist Intermediate

Amy of Gleann Abhann

Location: Barony of Axemoor, Gleann Abhann

Category/Level: Modern Recreationist/Intermediate

Project Update Blog: The Enchanted Tower

About Amy : I dabbled in the SCA back in college, and I’ve been dipping my toes back in over the last year or so. I am very comfortable using a sewing machine on a commercial sewing pattern, but I sew modern and vintage styles more frequently than medieval styles. I have very little experience drafting patterns; hence my hesitation to attempt a cotehardie. I haven’t settled on an SCA persona, or even a name, but this project is going to be a good opportunity to test out 14th century Western Europe.

Her Project: I’m planning to make a middle-class 14th century European woman’s outfit for myself. I’ve wanted a Gothic Fitted Dress/Cotehardie for several years, and this project is going to be my motivation to finally try one! Due to budget constraints – and the fact that this is going to be a wearable muslin – I plan to substitute cotton for linen and wool. My first layer will be a chemise, my second layer will be a fitted kirtle, and my third layer will be a Cotehardie. My accessory will probably be leather shoes as leatherworking is a different discipline and not something I’ve tried before.

Final Photos

Her final thoughts on her C3 experience:

Thank you for hosting this!

I’ve wanted to make a dress from this period for about 10 years now, and apparently this was the push that I needed to actually do it. It’s not perfect, but that’s okay! I think part of what’s been holding me back for so long was that I wanted my first gothic fitted dress to be perfectly fitted. This one isn’t, but it’s done. Pattern-drafting is hard, and it’s okay if you aren’t the best at something the first time you try it.

Layer 1

This is a woman’s plain cotton underdress. The neckline is very wide to remain unseen while accommodating the style of the first quarter of the 15th century in Western Europe. All visible stitching was completed by hand: felling the gores, skirt and sleeve hems, and neckline. I’ve made this pattern before, so I was able to copy most of the measurements and tweak the ones that I didn’t love from my last go-around this time. The pattern came from a blog post on Reconstructing History. Inserting gores into fabric slits remains challenging, but I found a tutorial on La cotte simple that did help it to lie more smoothly. I’m happy with this garment and might consider investing in a more expensive fabric if I have cause to make another underdress.

Layer 2

1400-1425 France woman’s fitted kirtle. I’m proud of this dress because I tried some new-to-me techniques like self-drafting and flat-lining. Although I didn’t quite get the fit that I wanted even after several muslins, I did manage to get the front of the gown to lace closed. This leads me to believe that I was on the right track with the fit, but that I needed some more help, and maybe in a post-pandemic world I can get that help. I also wonder how much of that fit would be improved by using better fabrics (there are limits to what cotton can do) and more a fitted undergarment. The sleeves especially felt like they suffered because it was hard to make them any tighter when there was so much loose fabric from the underdress fighting for space underneath. Now I want to research more options for undresses. Also, as I feared, by making my underdress first, the necklines don’t quite line up and the underdress peeks out at the shoulders from the kirtle. I definitely don’t have time to fix the underdress, but I have some other ideas for making the underdress less visible.

I did cheat a little bit while I was making this dress. The most obvious visible cheat is that I used my sewing machine to sew the eyelets (technically buttonholes because my machines only sews rectangles). My second big cheat was applying some medium-weight interfacing to the facing along the eyelet holes to help prevent gaping along that front edge. It was effective, and I did enter into the modern recreationist category.

I hand-stitched the visible seams – skirt hem, sleeve hems, and understitched the facing around the neckline. I have no idea if facings are period, but I’ve noticed that flat-lining is popular in SCA circles, and I know that bag-lining is a relatively modern innovation. Facings are certainly an efficient way to finish those edges.

This dress may not be perfect, but it is finished, and now I can start on my next layer.

Layer 3

In keeping with the rest of my outfit this is a gown meant to be worn by a middle-class woman in France circa 1400-1425. I substituted cotton* for linen for budgetary reasons. The gown is simple and relatively efficient, I made the whole thing with only 5 yards of fabric plus the lining. *I say that the gown is made of cotton because that is what I intended when I went to the store. I had a lovely blue selected, and found a bolt that was nice and thick so I was confident that I could get my full yardage. However, when I went up to the counter to get it cut the clerk unwrapped one cut yard of fabric and then another, and it became apparent that if I wanted a single cut of yard I would need another bolt. I went back to the same section and pulled a nearly identical bolt of fabric, but didn’t look closely at the label. After pre-washing the fabric I went to iron it and noticed that it had a lot more stretch to it than normal, so I think that I may have purchased a cotton-poly blend. Oh well.

Drafting the dress was challenging since this was something I don’t really know how to do, but I followed the tutorial offered by another C3 member. I can’t remember his name now, but it’s posted on the Stars and Garters blog, and it was a 6-panel gown. I didn’t get the fit quite right, but I got it done, and that is worth celebrating for me.

The bodice of the gown is lined in white muslin, and I used the same fabric to line the hanging portion of the sleeves. the bodice is flat-lined, but the sleeves are bag-lined. The sleeves should be lined in fur, not cotton, but that’s not practical in my current climate, so I used something else.

I had time to make one lucet-braided cord out of cotton embroidery floss to lace up the side of the gown. I also attached my first aglet to that cord, which was exciting. Unfortunately, the gown requires 2 laces, so I had to make do with ribbon on the other side. Imperfect, but it holds the gown together.

Layer 4

I made a necklace out of coral beads. I’ve seen a few of these on portraits of women throughout Europe in the 1300s. I’m not sure if it was right to make an alternating pattern of large and small beads or if it should have been large beads and knots as is seen on modern-day pearl necklaces.

Bonus Points

Beginner · Modern Beginner · Modern Recreationist

Aoife inghean Úi Thormaig

Location : Grimfells, Calontir

Category/Level: Modern Recreationist/Beginner

About Aoife: I attended my first event in October ’19. I only got to go to one more before Covid. Sewing is new and intimidating. I learned sewing, weaving, and embroidery just so I could fit in with you all. This project will hopefully be the fancy thing I can wear to court. It will not be easy. I’m already freaking out.

Her Project: I am new to the SCA and am making my kit myself because I can’t afford to buy clothes. I am aiming for pre-Norman Irish Celt because all my friends are Vikings. So, 10th-11th century? I’m not a fancy lady, but I do like to look nice. I’m making a pink underdress (I saw a picture of Mary wearing a pink leine once; Book of Kells, maybe) and a red leine with gold-colored trim out of linen. I will also make a red brat out of a cotton fleece I have, and I’ll try to embroider on it the fox that I hope will one day be on my device. I’ll likely weave some trim for some part of this. For the fourth item, maybe a copper cloak pin?

Final Pictures

Her final thoughts on the challenge:

I learned so much with this project. I can’t wait to make something else!

Layer 1

This is an underdress for this outfit, but I’ll be able to wear it on its own, too. I did underarm gussets, which didn’t turn out quite right, but I feel confident that I can do them better in the future. It’s pink linen, which matches my skin beautifully.

Layer 2

The overdress! It’s just like I had in my head! I had some trouble with the neckline, which was followed by a spectacular meltdown. Several people talked me through how to fix it, and now it’s so much prettier. I wove the trim from cotton thread on cardboard tablets I made. The dress is linen. I’d also like it noted that it didn’t fall apart in the washer.

Layer 3

This is my brat. I don’t know what the fabric is. It’s something Mom had on hand. I wish I’d had more fabric for this, because I feel that it’s a bit small. I did the embroidery on it, which didn’t turn out as pretty as I’d envisioned. But, I’m better at making uniform chain stitches now (though no better at turning corners). This is the layer I stabbed myself on!

Layer 4

I let my friend talk me into a kidney belt for my accessory layer. He helped me draft a pattern and told me how to do everything else, but I did all the work myself. This is veg-tanned cow hide. I used a gel antique for the color and designed the tooled pattern based on a coaster I saw online. I will probably make lucet cord lacing later.

Bonus Points

Intermediate · Modern Recreationist · Modern Recreationist Intermediate

Beatrice of Darkwater

Location: Midrealm

Category/Level: Modern Recreationist/Intermediate

About Beatrice : I started playing in the SCA in Trimaris about eight years ago and am currently living in the Midrealm. I have a fair amount of sewing experience, but have only made basic garb in the past. I have been wanting to up my garb game recently and this seemed like the perfect time to do it! In addition to sewing, I do a variety of crafts in the SCA, including kumihimo, jewelry making, fingerloop braiding, calligraphy and illumination, and banner making. At events, I can usually be found retaining or volunteering in some other way. This will be a challenging project for me, as I have not made garb above a basic level before. I fell in love with Roman garb during the hot outdoor events in Trimaris and am excited to make myself some new garb!

Her Project: I am planning to create an outfit that would have been worn by an unmarried upper class Roman woman of the Late Republic/Early Empire. I’ve been wanting to make a new, nicer outfit for a while, but this project has helped me focus that desire into a specific project.

Final Photos

Her final thoughts on her C3 experience:

I entered this challenge at an intermediate level knowing it would be a stretch for me. I had some sewing experience and knowledge of Roman clothing into C3, but had never tried to make a complete outfit like this. I have never entered any kind of arts and sciences competition before either. I learned a lot during this process that I look forward to applying to future projects. Thank you to all the wonderful volunteers for your work on this project!

Layer 1

The underlayers for my Late Roman Republic outfit for an unmarried woman consists of a strophium (bra band), subligar (underwear), and subucula (under tunic). Because these will not be seen by others and I am entering the modern recreationist category, I chose to machine sew all these pieces. The strophium is a long band that gets wrapped around the chest, similar to an ACE bandage. To create the pattern, I measured around my ribcage, multiplied that by 4, then added a few inches as ties. For the width, I measured just below my bust to just above my bust. I used a linen/cotton blend I already had in my stash, but wool or leather would be more common in period. Wool naturally has some stretch to it, but linen and cotton will stay stretched out once stretched. This leads to linen or cotton strophium needing to be adjusted throughout the day. Because I was using up fabric from my stash, I did sew the strophium in two pieces instead of making it out of one long piece. According to written evidence, subligar were not always worn by women. Extant art suggests they were worn at bathhouses and while exercising, but they also may have been worn during menstruation. I made my subligar based on an extant leather pair found in a well in Britain. The extant examples available look very much like a modern string bikini bottom made of leather. For my subligar, I chose to use a medium weight white linen out of my fabric stash and used cotton bias tape for the ties at the waist. I drafted my own pattern using a modern underwear tutorial. This was the most difficult piece to make this month, as I had to get the fit just right. But I think they turned out well. The subucula is a simple rectangle and was easy to make. I used the directions from Dulcia’s Roman Closet website to create my own pattern based off the directions for a closed shoulder tunic. I used a lightweight linen from fabric-store.com. During the Roman Republic, wool would likely have been the top choice for the under tunic, but linen, silk, cotton, and blends were all available. My subucula is mid-calf length and I left the bottom couple inches separate for ease of movement.

Layer 2

The second layer of my 1st century inspired Roman outfit is made up of the Tunica Muliebris, more commonly known today as the gap-sleeved tunic, and the Cingulum (belt). The tunica is made of a dark green wool/acrylic blend. The side seams were machine sewn, while the neckline, sleeve opening, and hem were all hand sewn. The fabric was thicker than I had anticipated and is not as drapey as a tunica should be, but it will make an excellent winter outfit! The Cingulum is made of cotton thread and woven by me on an inkle loom. I had planned to make the belt out of silk, but there were major delays in my supplies reaching me. So I went with the cotton I already had on hand. This is the first band I have ever woven. I really enjoyed weaving it and think it turned out quite well for a first attempt.

Layer 3

The third layer of my 1st century inspired Roman outfit is made up of the Palla, a large piece of cloth women would have worn for modesty when out of the house. Pallas would have likely been made of wool or a wool blend with cotton, silk, or linen. I chose to make my palla out of 100% silk, as it is a fabric I am familiar with. I purchased white silk from Dharma Trading Company, then dyed it lavender using modern batch dyeing techniques. I have a lot of experience modernly with silk dyeing, so I was able to get a nice even color on my palla. I hand hemmed the raw edges with silk thread so it would also dye the same color as the rest of the palla.

Layer 4

The fourth layer of my 1st century Roman outfit is consists of a necklace, two rings, and a pair of earrings. The necklace is made of sodalite and pearl beads and brass wire. The necklace is based on many examples found in period art as well as extant examples found at the British Museum. This was my first time making a necklace. I learned a lot during the process and look forward to refining my technique on future necklaces. The rings are also made of brass wire and are based on examples from the British Museum and The Met. The earrings are made of brass wire, small pearl beads, and a modern bracelet connector.

Bonus Points

Intermediate · Modern Recreationist · Modern Recreationist Intermediate

Birna Isleifsdottir

Location: Barony of Castlemere, Trimaris

Category/Level: Modern Recreationist/Intermediate

About Birna: I’ve been in the SCA for about 40 years. Own and operate an agro educational Icelandic farm in north east florida where we teach leather, wood, metal, and fiber arts. I have until now sewn by machine but have started sewing by hand; pretty ugly still. I have never embroidered. The garb design and initial construction should not be a problem. I have never made shoes before so that will be challenging. Also the trim; although I make the looms and teach the craft, takes many hours to get that much for hems and other pieces so that will be time consuming. I think the hardest for me will be the embroidery since I want to be very elaborate with Norse knot work and other designs in multi colors. This will be directly related to my persona and will be used when I compete at local, kingdom, and IKAC events.

Her Project: This is an archery outfit of my own thoughts. There will be a hood, shooting cap, dress, and apron. There will be hand woven trim; by me, on all the pieces and the dress, hopefully, will have embroidery around the hems and sleeves. I am doing this in a Norse style, early period. I also plan to make a pair of shoes in the Jorvik style and pour a pair of broaches at my forge. Although this is not fashion related I am also tooling a new leather quiver and making a set of period arrows. I am a mid 11th century Icelandic woman who was raised by my father to do everything the men do as well as what the women did around the farm. I fight, loose, do metal and wood, leather, cook, and run our farm.

The Complete Garment

Birna’s final thoughts on her C3 experience: i am very pleased with most of what I did. I wish I was better at embroidery at the beginning of this. I have had some very good practice over these past four months and I feel I have progressed. The dress I’m working on now for my wife; not in the challenge is way better than the dress I made for the challenge.

Layer 1

This layer is a Norse dress for someone in the tenth to eleventh century. I am Icelandic but it could be any of the Norse countries. The dress is part of an ensemble for a female Norse archer. The material is a camouflage pattern to blend into the woods of the landscape. The embroidery is hand stitched and the trim is hand woven on a loom that I built. This is the main layer of the ensemble. The next layer will be the pants and apron. After that will be the boots, hood, cap, and then final layer will be the weapons.

Layer 2

the pants are norse draw string pants. The apron is a strap apron with broaches.

Made my pants and apron from matching material. pants are lined with flannel for comfort and warmth. apron is double sided with the material for stability and strength. X stitched every seam on both pieces with embroidery floss. Embroidered six designs on the apron. made the trim for the straps on the viking flat braid loom that I made.

Layer 3

Early Icelandic woman’s archer garb. boots and cap. part of my entire ensemble.

Layer 4

This is a female archery garb for 11th century icelandic or scandinavian. it went as planned. Most was done by hand and although some was done by modern conveyance such as a gas forge it was substituted for an period method. This is all my work.

Layer 4+

this layer is all the bits and pieces that go with the garb. The two knives, the pouch, and the belt. All hand tooled and hand made.

Bonus Points

Intermediate · Modern Recreationist · Modern Recreationist Intermediate

Elizabeth Allen

Location: The Shire of Canale, West

Category/Level: Modern Recreationist/Intermediate

About Elizabeth: I reside in The Shire of Canale, Cynagua, The West. I have been in the sca for almost a year now! I picked up sewing to create garb and have taken some college classes on sewing and design. I love researching French/English court dress of the early 1560s, and am researching women’s education in the third quarter of the 16th century. This project is not for me, but will be made for my sister.

Her Project: I will be creating an outfit suitable for a Florentine lady of means around 1565-1575. The items required are, a Camica, a small farthingale, a supportive kirtle, a doublet dress, an over gown, and finally a set of jewels. The outfit is primarily based on, Follower of Francesco Salviati del Rossi, called Il Salviati
Portrait of a lady, half-length, in a richly embroidered, high-necked white dress with pink trim, a jeweled headdress and pearl necklace, seated holding gloves in her left hand.

Layer 1

This is a 1560s Florentine kirtle, and partlet. The pattern was drafted using the modern maker, and adjusted to fit the visual sources I referenced. It is made of cotton canvas, linen blend, and cotton velvet. The bodice is stiffened with layers of wool and buckram, pad stitched together to stay rigid. The partlet is made of fine white linen, and trimmed with gold picot braid. This layer took longer that anticipated, but I am happy with the results.

Bonus Points

Intermediate · Modern Recreationist · Modern Recreationist Intermediate

Lady Eyvor Halldorsdottir

Location: Barony of Tir Ysgithr, Atenveldt

Category/Level: Modern Recreationist/Intermediate

Project Update Blog: The Viking Apprentice

About Eyvor: Having been in the SCA for 15 years, most of my clothing and energy has been devoted to moving around the Viking-age world and with some dabbling into Rus. I’ve patterned clothing, handsewn full outfits, and generally dabbled in a decent amount in a number of things. I haven’t sewn much as of late, but I would consider myself to be competent enough with a machine that I can tackle anything with enough determination. The outfit isn’t one that fits what I normally do, but I wanted something different that would give me more variety in my SCA wardrobe. I expect that it should be a good challenge, but one that I can tackle and will result in a solid project that I’m pleased with.

Her Project: I’ve wanted a kirtle and cotehardie for a very long time, and actually bought fabric for it as everything was starting to shut down. I’m looking at doing an outfit roughly suited to middle class in the late 14th century. I want something comfortable, that I can wear in a number of situations, and accuracy is not as important to me for this. It’s a project to stretch my skills and to make me happy. This is being entered in the recreationst category primarily because I don’t have documentation for some of the colors and the exact stamping. The horse and raven symbolize both my household and my own heraldry – a white raven on a red background for Hrafnheim, and a white horse on blue for me. (My heraldry a blue horse on white, but I *will* get white quite dirty, so decided something else would look better.) As of now, the plan is as follows: *Short-sleeved white shift *Sleeveless linen kirtle *Long-sleeved parti-colored cotehardie (one side stamped with white ravens. the other with white horses) *accessories: paternoster, necklace, and earrings (all glass. all beads made by me for a non-sewing skill, glasswork)

Advanced · Modern Advanced · Modern Recreationist

Gisele de la Fontaine

Location: Barony of Couer d’Ennui, Calontir

Category/Level: Modern Recreationist/Advanced

About Gisele: I have been in the SCA since about 2015/16, I don’t recall when exactly. I do not sew regularly for myself in the SCA, though I do sew quite a bit for my partner. I dabble a bit in period cooking, sometimes making period recipes by accident, period dying is fun and I have recently started tinkering with illumination since I have all these hard won watercolor skills that aren’t currently in use. This particular project ties nicely into the direction my persona is going, which is developing more French, though all my current garb is Flemish. I started Flemish, mostly because the garb was comfy and there is a certain quality to late period Flemish kitchen scenes that I love. But in the last couple years I have drifted more French because the period cookbooks are fun, the politics are bonkers and the women of the late period French are a force to be reckoned with.

Her Project: Late Period French Lady’s Ensemble. Between 1530-1550. Lesser Nobility or Wealthy Merchant Class woman(new money from the newly expanding global trade). Not a recreation of any one particular dress, but a combination of features I like from a selection of paintings within the same time period/region. Hood from one image, trim from another, etc. Much of it styled after one of my favorite French Mistresses, Diane de Poitiers, a brilliant woman who managed to stay in favor at the court through multiple French Kings with her intelligence and beauty. Mostly, this ensemble is all the things that have been on the “to make eventually for myself” list. I have had most of the materials for a while, but while I was costuming for a living(the pre-covid times) I usually didn’t have the motivation to also sew in my off hours. I have collected several images for inspiration.

Final Photo

Layer 1

Layer 1. Chemise, Petticoat & Farthingale Chemise made of linen, following a pattern I made based on what I could see in French portraits from the first half of the 16th century. It is a yoked chemise with a yoke about 2” wide, fairly full sleeves gathered into a cuff at the wrist. I have not included a wrist ruffle, as I find them irritating, especially when trying to wash my hands at events and with no viable ruffle in some portraits I decided to leave them off. The second garment here is the requisite red petticoat, in my case made of red linen for added comfort and breathability. There are so many layers, any breathability I can get in the under layers I am going for. I have made a modification to the style, removing the shoulder straps and making it only go around the waist. I tried for a while to make the straps work, but with two additional shoulder layers being added on top, the limited range of motion caused by the petticoat straps sliding down constantly did not make the garment a joy to wear. So, I have removed them and made the petticoat to be able to lace onto the second layer’s farthingale for stability. This was much better for wearability. I have also made both layers a little shorter that seems indicated in my research, again for wearability. While I don’t think our historical counterparts would have had to encounter gymnasium bleachers all that often, they are a regular feature of our events and since it is easier to lift a farthingale than the layers under it, I made them shorter to make it safer to navigate the bleachers. Nothing ruins one’s dignity quite like falling on gym bleachers. On to the Farthingale. This was an especially fun piece to work on. In this case I used a tight woven, heavy shirting cotton I had in my stash for the base and a plaid taffeta for the hoop casings. And once again, the problem of navigating mundane spaces in period clothes raised its head. Hm, how to get in a car in a farthingale? The solution was to make the hoops removable and easy to reinsert. The hoops themselves are made of half round rattan caning purchased from a basket maker online. After a good sanding to smooth them out, they slide in and out of the casings easily and should make the whole ensemble easier to work with in the crowded spaces we sometimes find ourselves at events (looking at you Kris Kinder)

Layer 2

Layer 2. Kirtle and Foresleeves On to the Kirtle. Initially when I started this project I thought there would have to be a separate set of bodies under the kirtle for support but have been fortunate to find that is unnecessary with the quantity and quality of the boning I used in the kirtle itself. I have employed artificial whalebone in this case, for durability and because it is washable, giving the whole garment a better chance at a long life. Additionally for extra support I added a couple small pads under the breasts to keep them in place with small sudo-cups. No matter how tight I laced, the girls kept sliding around and clearly needed some direction as to where they should be. The pads solved this problem without having to strangle myself. The kirtle side laces, for ease of wear, make it possible to dress myself and keeps the back neckline free of any visible lacing. The foresleeves are another piece of period clothing fun that I love learning about. These little beauties tie just above the elbow to cover the chemise sleeve without adding bulk to the upper arm part of the oversleeve. These little guys are slashed with fake puffs pulled out, and as I prewashed my fabric, totally washable for when I inevitably drag a sleeve into something sticky.

Layer 3

Layer 3. Overgown and Hood. French Overgown 1540s. A noble woman of France, inspired by Diane de Poitiers (one of my favorite period people) and Catherine de’ Medici. Here is where it really gets fun. I found this fabric years ago and it has been in my stash awaiting something exactly like this to prompt me to actually make the gown. I have drafted the pattern from looking at assorted portraits from France between 1530 and 1550 as well as consulting the Tudor Tailor for any insights that they may have into construction, because a painting only tells you so much. This was great build and true to period practice, there is a bit of piecing on the skirt panels but it is practically invisible. I have made the gown without a train. While trained gowns are certainly beautiful, not so helpful at events. The bodice closes with under laced forebodies to hold it together and a placard to cover the front, making the closures very much hidden. For this particular project, I have made the over sleeves to lace in as I would like to be able to swap an alternate pair of fur lined sleeves in sometimes. The French Hood was a fun piece to build adn I will likely be making few more of these in the future. The discovery that floral wire really isn’t as sturdy as one might like is a good insight going forward, a double row or heavier gage would have helped a lot. A relatively straight forward pattern, as I have made other versions before, this one was extra fun because I got to use a bunch of small silk scraps that have been languishing in my stash for quite some time now. One is not fully dressed without a hat and this one is a great final piece.

Layer 4

Who doesn’t love a good meal! I decided that dinner would be a great final non sewing layer. So I did some digging and decided on a four course dinner if French and Italian dishes. A meal with a starter of sweet stewed figs, which are suggested as a dish for the beginning of the meal, but I think they are actually perfect over the torte bianca at the end. The funniest thing about this dish is when chilled they get very squeaky when you eat them. Like sneakers on a gym floor. Number two is a vegetable dish of cabbage with fennel and onions. I like this dish as it is not far from how I like to cook cabbage on the regular and is a nice salty compliment to the sweet chicken dish. Third comes a capon in orange sauce. This is a very sweet chicken dish and I have taken the liberty of modifying the rice dish to better work with the chicken. I used a whole chicken that I cut up myself and decided to remove the skin, since the idea of braised chicken skin did not sound even slightly appealing. The gentle stewing made for a really delicious and tender chicken. Fourth is the saffron rice is originally to be cooked into something more like a porridge. But I have chosen to make it with less broth than the original to make a fluffy rice, perfect for soaking up the orange sauce of the chicken. I got very lucky this fall to find saffron crocus bulbs at the local Lowes, so of course I bought a bunch and planted them. I got a fair amount of saffron from them this year and hope for more next year. The final dish is torte bianca, a ginger cheese pie. This was one of the first recipes I came across early in my SCA journey and I’m glad to finally have a reason to make it. Gingery, not too sweet, and the paest royall is an excellent crust with a texture a bit like shortbread. And I will be eating this for breakfast for the next several days because it is the size of a modern pie. Of course had I given more thought to the timing, like not finishing layer four before layer three was done, the pictures would have been better.

(Admin note: More information about this layer in the document at the bottom of the page)

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