Intermediate · Modern Recreationist · Modern Recreationist Intermediate

Æva Dyer

Location: Barony of Caerthe, Outlands

Category/Level: Modern Recreationist/Intermediate

Project Update Blog: Of Green and Gold

About Æva: I have been playing in the SCA for just about 4 years now. Sewing wise my mother taught me as a child and I have continued on making Halloween Costumes, Cosplay, and now historical garments. My recent sewing has been keeping my child in garb, and finishing off leftover projects from college… I sew often but finishing things is a weak point. I usually play 10th Century Anglo Saxon this is a huge challenge for me as we go from clever triangles and rectangles to curves and yards upon yards of fabric. The first dress I was given help from the lovely The Honorable Lady Isabelle de Calais, as she created a first draft of the bodice based on her own. I also referenced much of her work as I rushed to complete the dress in under a week. When I am not sewing I am playing with illumination and other fiber arts.

Her Project: The plan is to remake a noble woman’s 1560’s Venetian dress. I had made one for our Baronial 12th night this past year. However, the dress needs to be reworked and I would like to see a more complete outfit. If you have seen the Venetian Province of Treviso, Republic of Venice Paolo Caliari (Veronese), 1561: Detail from fresco Treviso, Villa Barbaro That is basically the color and cut of the dress I plan to make. However, this piece will be more Modern Recreationist as I do not have the knowledge or skill to bring this to a Historically Focused masterpiece. Why? I honestly fell in love with this dress! It is comfy yet elegant and I would like to do it justice not just leave it as a one-off. The Layers I plan to make a set of Drawers, fix the Camicia neckline, cut a new bodice to correct the errors I made on the first dress, re-do the pleats on the skirt properly and attach to the bodice, make a Partlet, make a pair of sleeves, making a zimarra, make a zibellini. I plan to hand sew, a number of pieces but because of the time limit will be using machine stitching as needed. I will also attempt to document my progress via my blog ofgreenandgold.com

Layer 1

Drawers- 16th Century Italy lady. Drawers have been documented by Janet Arnold and extent pieces exist. I made these based off a tutorial by Maestrina Chiaretta di Fiore (www.kitsclothingcollection.com) using the Bara Method outlined by the Modern Maker. I started by making a custom pattern based on the tutorial. First I made a set of Bara tapes. From there I drew the pattern out on paper before cutting some duckybunny to make a mockup. However once sewn up I found that the gusset was not needed as the inseam was long enough. Once the gusset was removed and the mockup resewn I ran about a bit to make sure I would not split them. Satisfied that the drawers fit I cut the final pair in a heavy linen. I also cut a cuff to finish the bottom. I machine stitched the main seams but chose to finish the front and back by hand to prevent fraying. I pressed the cuff in 4ths and used tacking stitch to attach them to the leg. I used the machine to top stitch them on. I folded the top over an inch to make a casing for the drawstring.

The drawstring I made using wool yarn I had dyed prior to this challenge with marigold and a lucet. The lucet was a new skill for me as I hadn’t owned one prior to this year and my last attempt with a borrowed one ended in a mess. Once I figured it out I made a length to use.

Over all I am pleased with making a working pair of pants. Pants are my nemesis and I haven’t made a working pair until now. The drawers are very comfy and I look forward to wearing them to events over my usual leggings.

Bonus Points

Intermediate · Modern Recreationist · Modern Recreationist Intermediate

Ambra Michelli

Location: Trimaris

Category/Level: Modern Recreationist/Intermediate

About Ambra: My first event was in the womb. In that time, I have learned to make sturdy lasting garb – but have opportunities to grow my quality and aesthetic. I am very excited for this challenge. In 2017, I was elevated to the order of the Laurel for my efforts in Written Works and the bardic community, and due service to my kingdom. I come from the shiny days of firelight catching trim, and am looking to step into something more authentic (while maintaining the convenience of my sewing machine – better for my attention span…). I actually have an Italian persona, but my household is Norse, linen breaths, and Trimaris is hot! This will be the perfect wander-by-night Gulf Wars outfit. Ideally.

Her Project: I plan to make a late Norse outfit – under-shift, apron, coat, and accessory. The coat especially is something I have wanted to make for some time. It may include some heraldry. I have not yet decided. It will be based on some historical examples and altered for my personal aesthetic.

Final Photos

Her Final thoughts on her C3 experience:

I’m so very grateful to the Volunteers who ran this competition. I rarely put this much effort into my own carb and this was a joy And a bit of a learning experience. Very excited and looking forward to many more projects that this has inspired.

Layer 1

Beaded and hand embroidered felt applique sleeves – underdress. Turned yolk w machine embroidery and trim. Machine embroidered seams. 
I am hard on my sleeves so did not edge embroider and the overdress will be elongated so no btm adornment would be visible. 

Layer 2

This second layer is a viking Norse Overdressed . It made out of hand-woven light Wool from Afghanistan . The And our roles and I added a bit of trim. In retrospect I don’t like that addition and will remove the trim, but for the purpose of this competition It fits as embroidery a dormant. One final note, normally I embroider the seams however I am going through a weight transition and if I were to add gores it would ruin the dress given the delicate nature of the fabric so I decided not to. The lay of the fabric is lovely And the feel even more so. I love the way this turned out. The straps are attached in the back for convenience but Loose in the front as they would have been And penned to fit . The seams are all Surge and or rolled depending . And the Rocks themselves or the wool fabric Tubed And flipped and then some down.

Layer 3

This Overcoat was an exciting project. The fabric looks well but I think has a little plastic in it I just a little rough on the fingers . It doesn’t feel synthetic but it’s not Soft to the touch. Or scratching the way will can be. So I faced/lined it with a linen canvas Which makes it feel really good against Your skin where it touches . I flipped the sleeves so the edges wouldn’t irritate my wrists And Trimmed around the sleeve matching the bordering trim Of the open neck. I also added some Byzantine trim to the bottom Which was more complicated than I assumed given its thickness. I also use an embroidery pattern Documentable for the Era Down the seams .

Layer 4

The last layer was an accessory. I thought about doing a headdress but in the end decided this outfit needed jewelry. So I created three strands of beads , Careful to ensure they reflected the color scheme, but also contrasted against the brown of the Overdress. I used Norse brooches that I already had To complete the outfit . I’m very happy with this layer’s result.

Bonus Points

Intermediate · Modern Recreationist · Modern Recreationist Intermediate

Amy of Gleann Abhann

Location: Barony of Axemoor, Gleann Abhann

Category/Level: Modern Recreationist/Intermediate

Project Update Blog: The Enchanted Tower

About Amy : I dabbled in the SCA back in college, and I’ve been dipping my toes back in over the last year or so. I am very comfortable using a sewing machine on a commercial sewing pattern, but I sew modern and vintage styles more frequently than medieval styles. I have very little experience drafting patterns; hence my hesitation to attempt a cotehardie. I haven’t settled on an SCA persona, or even a name, but this project is going to be a good opportunity to test out 14th century Western Europe.

Her Project: I’m planning to make a middle-class 14th century European woman’s outfit for myself. I’ve wanted a Gothic Fitted Dress/Cotehardie for several years, and this project is going to be my motivation to finally try one! Due to budget constraints – and the fact that this is going to be a wearable muslin – I plan to substitute cotton for linen and wool. My first layer will be a chemise, my second layer will be a fitted kirtle, and my third layer will be a Cotehardie. My accessory will probably be leather shoes as leatherworking is a different discipline and not something I’ve tried before.

Final Photos

Her final thoughts on her C3 experience:

Thank you for hosting this!

I’ve wanted to make a dress from this period for about 10 years now, and apparently this was the push that I needed to actually do it. It’s not perfect, but that’s okay! I think part of what’s been holding me back for so long was that I wanted my first gothic fitted dress to be perfectly fitted. This one isn’t, but it’s done. Pattern-drafting is hard, and it’s okay if you aren’t the best at something the first time you try it.

Layer 1

This is a woman’s plain cotton underdress. The neckline is very wide to remain unseen while accommodating the style of the first quarter of the 15th century in Western Europe. All visible stitching was completed by hand: felling the gores, skirt and sleeve hems, and neckline. I’ve made this pattern before, so I was able to copy most of the measurements and tweak the ones that I didn’t love from my last go-around this time. The pattern came from a blog post on Reconstructing History. Inserting gores into fabric slits remains challenging, but I found a tutorial on La cotte simple that did help it to lie more smoothly. I’m happy with this garment and might consider investing in a more expensive fabric if I have cause to make another underdress.

Layer 2

1400-1425 France woman’s fitted kirtle. I’m proud of this dress because I tried some new-to-me techniques like self-drafting and flat-lining. Although I didn’t quite get the fit that I wanted even after several muslins, I did manage to get the front of the gown to lace closed. This leads me to believe that I was on the right track with the fit, but that I needed some more help, and maybe in a post-pandemic world I can get that help. I also wonder how much of that fit would be improved by using better fabrics (there are limits to what cotton can do) and more a fitted undergarment. The sleeves especially felt like they suffered because it was hard to make them any tighter when there was so much loose fabric from the underdress fighting for space underneath. Now I want to research more options for undresses. Also, as I feared, by making my underdress first, the necklines don’t quite line up and the underdress peeks out at the shoulders from the kirtle. I definitely don’t have time to fix the underdress, but I have some other ideas for making the underdress less visible.

I did cheat a little bit while I was making this dress. The most obvious visible cheat is that I used my sewing machine to sew the eyelets (technically buttonholes because my machines only sews rectangles). My second big cheat was applying some medium-weight interfacing to the facing along the eyelet holes to help prevent gaping along that front edge. It was effective, and I did enter into the modern recreationist category.

I hand-stitched the visible seams – skirt hem, sleeve hems, and understitched the facing around the neckline. I have no idea if facings are period, but I’ve noticed that flat-lining is popular in SCA circles, and I know that bag-lining is a relatively modern innovation. Facings are certainly an efficient way to finish those edges.

This dress may not be perfect, but it is finished, and now I can start on my next layer.

Layer 3

In keeping with the rest of my outfit this is a gown meant to be worn by a middle-class woman in France circa 1400-1425. I substituted cotton* for linen for budgetary reasons. The gown is simple and relatively efficient, I made the whole thing with only 5 yards of fabric plus the lining. *I say that the gown is made of cotton because that is what I intended when I went to the store. I had a lovely blue selected, and found a bolt that was nice and thick so I was confident that I could get my full yardage. However, when I went up to the counter to get it cut the clerk unwrapped one cut yard of fabric and then another, and it became apparent that if I wanted a single cut of yard I would need another bolt. I went back to the same section and pulled a nearly identical bolt of fabric, but didn’t look closely at the label. After pre-washing the fabric I went to iron it and noticed that it had a lot more stretch to it than normal, so I think that I may have purchased a cotton-poly blend. Oh well.

Drafting the dress was challenging since this was something I don’t really know how to do, but I followed the tutorial offered by another C3 member. I can’t remember his name now, but it’s posted on the Stars and Garters blog, and it was a 6-panel gown. I didn’t get the fit quite right, but I got it done, and that is worth celebrating for me.

The bodice of the gown is lined in white muslin, and I used the same fabric to line the hanging portion of the sleeves. the bodice is flat-lined, but the sleeves are bag-lined. The sleeves should be lined in fur, not cotton, but that’s not practical in my current climate, so I used something else.

I had time to make one lucet-braided cord out of cotton embroidery floss to lace up the side of the gown. I also attached my first aglet to that cord, which was exciting. Unfortunately, the gown requires 2 laces, so I had to make do with ribbon on the other side. Imperfect, but it holds the gown together.

Layer 4

I made a necklace out of coral beads. I’ve seen a few of these on portraits of women throughout Europe in the 1300s. I’m not sure if it was right to make an alternating pattern of large and small beads or if it should have been large beads and knots as is seen on modern-day pearl necklaces.

Bonus Points

Intermediate · Modern Recreationist · Modern Recreationist Intermediate

Beatrice of Darkwater

Location: Midrealm

Category/Level: Modern Recreationist/Intermediate

About Beatrice : I started playing in the SCA in Trimaris about eight years ago and am currently living in the Midrealm. I have a fair amount of sewing experience, but have only made basic garb in the past. I have been wanting to up my garb game recently and this seemed like the perfect time to do it! In addition to sewing, I do a variety of crafts in the SCA, including kumihimo, jewelry making, fingerloop braiding, calligraphy and illumination, and banner making. At events, I can usually be found retaining or volunteering in some other way. This will be a challenging project for me, as I have not made garb above a basic level before. I fell in love with Roman garb during the hot outdoor events in Trimaris and am excited to make myself some new garb!

Her Project: I am planning to create an outfit that would have been worn by an unmarried upper class Roman woman of the Late Republic/Early Empire. I’ve been wanting to make a new, nicer outfit for a while, but this project has helped me focus that desire into a specific project.

Final Photos

Her final thoughts on her C3 experience:

I entered this challenge at an intermediate level knowing it would be a stretch for me. I had some sewing experience and knowledge of Roman clothing into C3, but had never tried to make a complete outfit like this. I have never entered any kind of arts and sciences competition before either. I learned a lot during this process that I look forward to applying to future projects. Thank you to all the wonderful volunteers for your work on this project!

Layer 1

The underlayers for my Late Roman Republic outfit for an unmarried woman consists of a strophium (bra band), subligar (underwear), and subucula (under tunic). Because these will not be seen by others and I am entering the modern recreationist category, I chose to machine sew all these pieces. The strophium is a long band that gets wrapped around the chest, similar to an ACE bandage. To create the pattern, I measured around my ribcage, multiplied that by 4, then added a few inches as ties. For the width, I measured just below my bust to just above my bust. I used a linen/cotton blend I already had in my stash, but wool or leather would be more common in period. Wool naturally has some stretch to it, but linen and cotton will stay stretched out once stretched. This leads to linen or cotton strophium needing to be adjusted throughout the day. Because I was using up fabric from my stash, I did sew the strophium in two pieces instead of making it out of one long piece. According to written evidence, subligar were not always worn by women. Extant art suggests they were worn at bathhouses and while exercising, but they also may have been worn during menstruation. I made my subligar based on an extant leather pair found in a well in Britain. The extant examples available look very much like a modern string bikini bottom made of leather. For my subligar, I chose to use a medium weight white linen out of my fabric stash and used cotton bias tape for the ties at the waist. I drafted my own pattern using a modern underwear tutorial. This was the most difficult piece to make this month, as I had to get the fit just right. But I think they turned out well. The subucula is a simple rectangle and was easy to make. I used the directions from Dulcia’s Roman Closet website to create my own pattern based off the directions for a closed shoulder tunic. I used a lightweight linen from fabric-store.com. During the Roman Republic, wool would likely have been the top choice for the under tunic, but linen, silk, cotton, and blends were all available. My subucula is mid-calf length and I left the bottom couple inches separate for ease of movement.

Layer 2

The second layer of my 1st century inspired Roman outfit is made up of the Tunica Muliebris, more commonly known today as the gap-sleeved tunic, and the Cingulum (belt). The tunica is made of a dark green wool/acrylic blend. The side seams were machine sewn, while the neckline, sleeve opening, and hem were all hand sewn. The fabric was thicker than I had anticipated and is not as drapey as a tunica should be, but it will make an excellent winter outfit! The Cingulum is made of cotton thread and woven by me on an inkle loom. I had planned to make the belt out of silk, but there were major delays in my supplies reaching me. So I went with the cotton I already had on hand. This is the first band I have ever woven. I really enjoyed weaving it and think it turned out quite well for a first attempt.

Layer 3

The third layer of my 1st century inspired Roman outfit is made up of the Palla, a large piece of cloth women would have worn for modesty when out of the house. Pallas would have likely been made of wool or a wool blend with cotton, silk, or linen. I chose to make my palla out of 100% silk, as it is a fabric I am familiar with. I purchased white silk from Dharma Trading Company, then dyed it lavender using modern batch dyeing techniques. I have a lot of experience modernly with silk dyeing, so I was able to get a nice even color on my palla. I hand hemmed the raw edges with silk thread so it would also dye the same color as the rest of the palla.

Layer 4

The fourth layer of my 1st century Roman outfit is consists of a necklace, two rings, and a pair of earrings. The necklace is made of sodalite and pearl beads and brass wire. The necklace is based on many examples found in period art as well as extant examples found at the British Museum. This was my first time making a necklace. I learned a lot during the process and look forward to refining my technique on future necklaces. The rings are also made of brass wire and are based on examples from the British Museum and The Met. The earrings are made of brass wire, small pearl beads, and a modern bracelet connector.

Bonus Points

Intermediate · Modern Recreationist · Modern Recreationist Intermediate

Birna Isleifsdottir

Location: Barony of Castlemere, Trimaris

Category/Level: Modern Recreationist/Intermediate

About Birna: I’ve been in the SCA for about 40 years. Own and operate an agro educational Icelandic farm in north east florida where we teach leather, wood, metal, and fiber arts. I have until now sewn by machine but have started sewing by hand; pretty ugly still. I have never embroidered. The garb design and initial construction should not be a problem. I have never made shoes before so that will be challenging. Also the trim; although I make the looms and teach the craft, takes many hours to get that much for hems and other pieces so that will be time consuming. I think the hardest for me will be the embroidery since I want to be very elaborate with Norse knot work and other designs in multi colors. This will be directly related to my persona and will be used when I compete at local, kingdom, and IKAC events.

Her Project: This is an archery outfit of my own thoughts. There will be a hood, shooting cap, dress, and apron. There will be hand woven trim; by me, on all the pieces and the dress, hopefully, will have embroidery around the hems and sleeves. I am doing this in a Norse style, early period. I also plan to make a pair of shoes in the Jorvik style and pour a pair of broaches at my forge. Although this is not fashion related I am also tooling a new leather quiver and making a set of period arrows. I am a mid 11th century Icelandic woman who was raised by my father to do everything the men do as well as what the women did around the farm. I fight, loose, do metal and wood, leather, cook, and run our farm.

The Complete Garment

Birna’s final thoughts on her C3 experience: i am very pleased with most of what I did. I wish I was better at embroidery at the beginning of this. I have had some very good practice over these past four months and I feel I have progressed. The dress I’m working on now for my wife; not in the challenge is way better than the dress I made for the challenge.

Layer 1

This layer is a Norse dress for someone in the tenth to eleventh century. I am Icelandic but it could be any of the Norse countries. The dress is part of an ensemble for a female Norse archer. The material is a camouflage pattern to blend into the woods of the landscape. The embroidery is hand stitched and the trim is hand woven on a loom that I built. This is the main layer of the ensemble. The next layer will be the pants and apron. After that will be the boots, hood, cap, and then final layer will be the weapons.

Layer 2

the pants are norse draw string pants. The apron is a strap apron with broaches.

Made my pants and apron from matching material. pants are lined with flannel for comfort and warmth. apron is double sided with the material for stability and strength. X stitched every seam on both pieces with embroidery floss. Embroidered six designs on the apron. made the trim for the straps on the viking flat braid loom that I made.

Layer 3

Early Icelandic woman’s archer garb. boots and cap. part of my entire ensemble.

Layer 4

This is a female archery garb for 11th century icelandic or scandinavian. it went as planned. Most was done by hand and although some was done by modern conveyance such as a gas forge it was substituted for an period method. This is all my work.

Layer 4+

this layer is all the bits and pieces that go with the garb. The two knives, the pouch, and the belt. All hand tooled and hand made.

Bonus Points

Intermediate · Modern Recreationist · Modern Recreationist Intermediate

Elizabeth Allen

Location: The Shire of Canale, West

Category/Level: Modern Recreationist/Intermediate

About Elizabeth: I reside in The Shire of Canale, Cynagua, The West. I have been in the sca for almost a year now! I picked up sewing to create garb and have taken some college classes on sewing and design. I love researching French/English court dress of the early 1560s, and am researching women’s education in the third quarter of the 16th century. This project is not for me, but will be made for my sister.

Her Project: I will be creating an outfit suitable for a Florentine lady of means around 1565-1575. The items required are, a Camica, a small farthingale, a supportive kirtle, a doublet dress, an over gown, and finally a set of jewels. The outfit is primarily based on, Follower of Francesco Salviati del Rossi, called Il Salviati
Portrait of a lady, half-length, in a richly embroidered, high-necked white dress with pink trim, a jeweled headdress and pearl necklace, seated holding gloves in her left hand.

Layer 1

This is a 1560s Florentine kirtle, and partlet. The pattern was drafted using the modern maker, and adjusted to fit the visual sources I referenced. It is made of cotton canvas, linen blend, and cotton velvet. The bodice is stiffened with layers of wool and buckram, pad stitched together to stay rigid. The partlet is made of fine white linen, and trimmed with gold picot braid. This layer took longer that anticipated, but I am happy with the results.

Bonus Points

Intermediate · Modern Recreationist · Modern Recreationist Intermediate

Lady Eyvor Halldorsdottir

Location: Barony of Tir Ysgithr, Atenveldt

Category/Level: Modern Recreationist/Intermediate

Project Update Blog: The Viking Apprentice

About Eyvor: Having been in the SCA for 15 years, most of my clothing and energy has been devoted to moving around the Viking-age world and with some dabbling into Rus. I’ve patterned clothing, handsewn full outfits, and generally dabbled in a decent amount in a number of things. I haven’t sewn much as of late, but I would consider myself to be competent enough with a machine that I can tackle anything with enough determination. The outfit isn’t one that fits what I normally do, but I wanted something different that would give me more variety in my SCA wardrobe. I expect that it should be a good challenge, but one that I can tackle and will result in a solid project that I’m pleased with.

Her Project: I’ve wanted a kirtle and cotehardie for a very long time, and actually bought fabric for it as everything was starting to shut down. I’m looking at doing an outfit roughly suited to middle class in the late 14th century. I want something comfortable, that I can wear in a number of situations, and accuracy is not as important to me for this. It’s a project to stretch my skills and to make me happy. This is being entered in the recreationst category primarily because I don’t have documentation for some of the colors and the exact stamping. The horse and raven symbolize both my household and my own heraldry – a white raven on a red background for Hrafnheim, and a white horse on blue for me. (My heraldry a blue horse on white, but I *will* get white quite dirty, so decided something else would look better.) As of now, the plan is as follows: *Short-sleeved white shift *Sleeveless linen kirtle *Long-sleeved parti-colored cotehardie (one side stamped with white ravens. the other with white horses) *accessories: paternoster, necklace, and earrings (all glass. all beads made by me for a non-sewing skill, glasswork)

Intermediate · Modern Recreationist · Modern Recreationist Intermediate

Guendolen Le Renard

Location: Tir-y-don, Atlantia

Category/Level: Modern Recreationist/Intermediate

About Guendolen: Greetings fair folk, I am Guendolen. I’ve been playing off and on in the SCA for about 20 year with a longish break after an unfortunate relationship event. I prefer all sorts of creative endeavors from sewing to belly dancing. I’ve been looking forward to creating this clothing combo for my persona for quite a few years with many, many failed attempts. This time, however, I feel I am ready to take up the challenge – this very challenging challenge. Well met and good tidings to all.

Her Project: The plan is to recreate a twelfth century bliaut, overdress, cloak, and belt and or pouch. I am basing the ensemble from several illuminated pieces that highlight the overdress and several extent pieces for the cloak. It appeared to be something a high born lady would have worn in France at the time my persona would have lived (1140s – 1170s). I have been working up my nerve and my knowledge base to create these pieces and this was just the excuse I needed to jump into it.

Final Photos

Her final thoughts on her C3 experience:

I had a great deal of fun and came out with a complete set of garb for my persona. I call that a win!

Layer 1

Bliaut 12th (mainly 1140-1170) Frankish, female grab, noble class. I used a silk I purchase sewing by hand sewing and machine stitching. Primarily two pieces with four gore inserts. It went together better than I expected. I’d attempted many dry runs before with abysmal results. Guess silk really makes a difference for this style of dress. I dreaded doing the lacing but attaching a separate cord to the dress, making loops for the ties to go through worked out brilliantly. It fits well and frankly I didn’t want to take it off it was so comfortable. The only thing I would change would be to size it down an inch on the sides. I think that would allow the folds to folds along the body to do its thing better.

Layer 2

Overcoat – 12th cent

Layer 3

Cloak – 12th cent half round

Layer 4

Broach- 12th century. Based on a pendent I found online. I sculpted the broach from an oil based clay. I changed the dragon so that it had a fox like head and tail. I panicked a bit at the end because I misplaced the molding compound I was going to use. I got the best I could find at the craft store. I basically rushed the whole casting process. The mold is horrible. I reproduced it with oven hardening clay and then fixed the mold errors(mostly unintentional voids) as best I could. Attached a broach pin, again whatever I could find at the craft store, to the back. The pin worked out better than expected. I plan on fixing the sculpt and recasting once I find my other stuff.

Bonus Points

Intermediate · Modern Recreationist · Modern Recreationist Intermediate

Jorunna Refsdottir

Location: Barony of the Lonely Tower, Calontir

Category/Level: Modern Recreationist/Intermediate

About Jorunna: I’ve been in the SCA going on 4 years now. I’ve been learning to sew my own garb the past 3 years and slowly building up my collection. A good portion of what I have is Norse. However, I have a Persian outfit, a gift bliaut, a couple of Italian dresses, and some roman chitons. I want to have garb from all different times and locations, and have a list of what all I want to make. In the SCA I also do target archery, equestrian, mounted archery, heavy combat, combat archery, embroidery, and dabble in bardic. This endeavor is going to be a bit challenging for me, but I’m excited to learn new skills and have a new outfit!

Her Project: I am looking to make my first 12th Century French bliaut. This project is to add a summer weight or light weight bliaut for warmer weather. I was given a velvet bliaut from a friend, but it’s too heavy for warm weather events. This one will be made from a beautiful silk looking cotton rayon brocade. The fabric has embroidered fleur de lis in gold. The sleeves will be lined with actual silk that is lavender and gold. I plan to make a matching veil too. For inspiration I’ve been looking at images of the carvings on the Cathedral de Chartes, some illuminations, and some other SCAdians’ examples of bliauts. This is a chance for me to make something completely new that I’ve never attempted before. I’m excited to be expanding my sewing skills and knowledge and branching out historically!

Final Pictures

Her final thoughts on the challenge:

I learned a lot with this outfit. I am pretty happy with how it turned out and look forward to wearing it to an event. It’s not 100% perfect, but for my first try I am thrilled how it turned out.

Layer 1

This is an underdress for my 12th century ensemble. The outfit is meant to be a noble. I cut out the dress as a standard early period underdress. Using rectangles, triangles, and squares in the pattern. I decided to go with a scoop neck neckline on this dress, and realized after that I probably should’ve cut it an inch smaller than what I did, but it’s ok, and will work. I decided against decorating the underdress with embroidery, so that I can use it as part of other early period ensembles as well. It’s a pretty base layer and I love the color of this dress.

Layer 2

This is my 12th century bliaut main dress. It’s made of cotton/rayon blend that feels and acts like silk taffeta in a lot of ways. The sleeves and neck (purple/gold) is real silk that was repurposed from sari silk. It’s very lightweight and sewing the two together proved extremely challenging! I had to hand sew almost of the time on it because it kept sliding when I tried to use the machine. I did 20 hand sewn eyelets in the side of the dress. They took a while, but I learned a lot! I decided to machine sew the dress hem because 1. It would be more sturdy and hold up better. 2. I was running out of time for this project because we bought a house and have to move at the end of the month. If I had more time I would’ve hand sewn the hem too.

Layer 3

This was a 3/4 circular mantle I made as the top layer of my entry. It’s based on some of the courtly mantles seen in the paintings of the 12th century. I used a wool/poly felt blend for the top of it. I used fake fur to line it. That was awful. The fake fur while super soft and warm has a stretchy backing that made it difficult to work with. It took 4 times as long as it should have because of that horrible material and I will never use it again. Lessons have been learned. I found a really pretty metallic trim to edge the front of the mantle. This piece was almost entirely machine sewn. The brooches I got from Raymond’s quiet press and are replicas of 12th century brooches.

Layer 4

This is a leather belt I did. I’ve never done leather working other than cleaning horse tack and armor, prior to this. It was all new! I bought a simple blank and the 12th century replicas for the belt findings. I stamped the leather with a circle and Celtic knot design. Then riveted on the findings. I didn’t want to dye it black, but not sure what color I really want with it, so I left it natural for now.

Layer 4+

Rectangular silk veil. I sewed it on two sides. It’s an attempt at a veil similar to those seen in the 12th century statues and paintings. It’s the same silk I used to line my sleeves and as contrast on the collar of my main dress.

Bonus Points

Intermediate · Modern Recreationist · Modern Recreationist Intermediate

Lady Katherine Stewart

Location: Southron Gaard, Lochac

Category/Level: Modern Recreationist/Intermediate

About Katherine: I have been involved in the SCA since 2006. I had 3 young boys who loved anything to do with vikings and knights so when the opportunity came up to go to a tournament we went. Basically we have not stopped. My sons are grown now and 2 have joined the NZ army, but I still love it. I have always loved sewing and making things so it’s my happy place. I am making my entry for a very good friend and it will hopefully be challenging.

Her Project: (undecided)

Final Photos

Her final thoughts on her C3 experience:

Thank you so much for running this! I will be finishing the outfit but not in time. Still want to do the hangerok and coat.

Layer 1

I completed the underwear layer of the Norse outfit I am making. I had to make the pattern first and that meant an afternoon of measuring my model and snacks and chatting. Then I made a mock up from a sheet and we had a fitting, after a couple of tweaks I have completed the chemise. Handsewn and a little embroidery around the neckline.

Layer 2

This month I made the 2nd layer which is the dress/tunic of the viking outfit I am making. I am late getting it done but life has been super busy this month. My model and I have not been able to get together so I don’t have a photo of her in it. will work on it over december. I have hand sewn all the seams and the wool was great to work with.

Layer 4

I made a period style Viking box to put the clothing in. The cutting of the pieces was a little scary but it was done. I made a boo boo with 1 of the nails but it was sorted. (My Knight is a wood worker) I loved plaining to curve on the top but my chesiling needs practice. I would love to make another one.

Bonus Points