Group · Historically Focused · Intermediate

Actreo

Group Members: Baroness Linnet del Grenewode,

Location: Barony of Carolingia, East

Category/Level: Historically Focused/Intermediate

About Actreo: The two of us are a couple who have been in and out of the SCA for years. We heard about the Challenge from people in our local group. We will be making garments that we have wanted to make for a while. The inspiration of this challenge is a gift right now.

Project Update Blog: Crafting Ourselves – An SCA Arts and Sciences Journey

Their Project: We will be making a set of clothes for a high status (Thegn level) man and woman from England in the mid 11th Century. These garments will be based on artwork and writings done in period, as well as fragments from grave finds. We have been researching on this period for a while, but have yet to make a set of historically accurate clothing for the late Anglo Saxon time period. We need a set of court garb, not just pennsic clothes. We will be making for the man a shirt, trousers, tunic and cloak, and for the woman a smock, gown, mantel, and veil, as well as a number of smaller pieces.

Layer 1

We are making clothing suitable for an Anglo Saxon man and his wife who are high status individuals (Thegn level). There is little evidence of how the underlayer of clothing looked in the form of illuminations or grave finds for this time period for anglo saxon culture in England. There are many written sources, particular the words in Old English used for garment types. We used 2 main sources of information for making our decisions on how to make this: Dress in Anglo Saxon England by Gale Owen-Crocker, and the Authenticity Guide for Regia Anglorum.

For the man, the first layer would be a linen shirt or tunic, and either trousers, or hose and braies. We chose to make a simple shirt similar to those made elsewhere because the word Scyrte implies a shorter garment, rather than a full undertunic. the shirt has square gussets under the sleeves, and a keyhole neckline bound with silk.Hose and Braies were coming in as a style, but the anglo saxon trousers were still worn. After looking at, and experimenting with several reconstructions of early trousers starting with the iron age Thorsberg trousers, we decided to make the trousers by starting with 2 tubes with a seam down the inner leg. We tried several types of gussets and gores, and found that for us, they fit the best by taking in the lower legs, and adding a square crotch gusset. We left the bottom of the inseam open for the last few inches to get the trousers on over the foot. The trousers were held up with a linen twill tape tie. There was evidence for either ties or belts for this. There are old english words for what is assumed to be a loin cloth, but we opted to stay with modern underwear underneath.

For the woman, the first layer is a linen Smoc made in a similar pattern as layer 2 will be. We used the Nockert Type 1 form of tunic, as this is the most common type of tunic found around the 11th century. This tunic has square underarm gussets and side gores. We did not use center gores. Images of women’s clothing at this time appear to be mainly vertical in line, without much flaring out from the waist. The sleeves were very long and tight. The look at this time was for smoc sleeves to go over the hand some, and to have wrinkles on the forearm. The cuffs and necklines were bound with silk. There was a thriving silk trade in England at this time, and silk ribbons and strips were commonly used if one could afford it. The cap is to cover the hair so it does not show under the veil or wimple that will be added later. There are words for this garment like Feax Clap (head cloth), but what it looked like is up to interpretation. We used the English Cap proposed by Regia Anglorum for this. It is similar to a viking cap, but rounded at the top, and larger, so that all of the hair is covered. Some people use something like a St Birgitta cap, but that would seem to be to late to be used at this time.

All sewing was done by hand using waxed thread (linen for linen, silk for silk). Construction seams were done in back stitch; flat fell with whip stitch; and attaching strips to the edges with running stitch.

Both Linnet and Kendrick worked on this layer. Both of us worked on pattern development. Linnet did most of the construction sewing. Kendrick did the embroidery embellishment on the cap. He will be making many yards of fingerloop braid for the next 2 layers, as well as tablet weaving, and has already started working on those.

Bonus Points

Historic Intermediate · Historically Focused · Intermediate

Adelaide Sarsfield

Location: Cum an Iolair, Calontir

Category/Level: Historically Focused/Intermediate

About Adelaide: I began in Ansteorra, took a decade-long break when I had my daughter, and arrived in Calontir around 2012. I enjoy many skills within the SCA, but I am probably best known for sharing those skills with the children of the kingdom, during my time as Kingdom Minister of Youth.

Her Project: I’ve had some lovely fabric that has been begging to become an Italian gown, so I will make a 15th Century Venetian gown. There are a few historical paintings that show a lovely front-laced gown, such as the woman in pink in Ghirlandaio’s Birth of St. John the Baptist.

Advanced · Historic Advanced · Historically Focused

Æsa Helgulfsdottir

Location: Barony of Endless Hills, Æthelmearc

Category/Level: Historically Focused/Advanced

Project Update Blog : In Wolf’s Clothes

About Æsa: I’ve been in the SCA for about 13 years. While I love sewing, I also enjoy playing with other skills like archery, knife and axe throwing, fiber arts, basket weaving, herbalism, soap making, pottery and brewing/cooking. I love acquiring skills that a Viking wife would have used in her everyday life. While the sewing aspects of the garments will not be difficult, historical clothing can sometimes present challenges as I am paralyzed. I often have to strike a balance between something that looks as correct as possible while also being comfortable, allowing for medical restrictions and not hindering my wheelchair’s movement.

Her Project: I’m hoping to create an ensemble that would have been worn by the Norse wife of a fairly well-off land owner in 10th century Jorvik. The piece is not based on any single burial find, but takes inspiration from several. The plan is for wool stockings, a linen underdress, a woolen dress and apron with jewelry and a head covering. The goal is to spin and weave a component of the ensemble.

Layer 1

My Norse linen underdress went as planned, as I am very used to making this style of gown for myself. I hand sewed all the seams and tacked them down using a running stitch and matching threads. For my stockings, I struggled a little deciding what to make. Many of the current interpretations from archeological finds seem to have a seam running along the sole of the foot, which I was afraid would be very irritating as I have some nerve issues from the paralysis. I also knew that I wanted the stockings to end below the knee, as I didn’t want to have any fabric bunched behind the knee as my legs are always bent. In the end, I used a pattern that I had drafted about ten years ago from “The Medieval Tailor’s Assistant” as I knew that it was comfortable to wear. The stockings were made from brown wool flannel, hand sewn and the seams were tacked down using a running stitch in contrasting thread.

Bonus Points

Advanced · Historic Advanced · Historically Focused

Aethelwynne of Grimfells

Location: The Shire-March of Grimfells

Category/Level: Historically Focused/Advanced

About Aethelwynne: I joined the SCA last February, so I’m still very new! I sew regularly, both for work and for fun, and have been creating historical costumes for about 10 years now. I originally started with Victorian-era costuming, and worked my way back through time to early medieval, which is now my absolute favorite period of history to study. Besides sewing, I also participate in heavy combat and archery with my local group. This project does directly tie in to my persona, a 10th century Anglo-Saxon woman. I think the sewing itself will be easy for me, but the bits I’m hoping to do, specifically the embellishments on the gown and wimple, will definitely be harder as I’m still learning to tablet weave and embroider!

Her Project: I’m planning on making a late 10th-early 11th century, high status Anglo Saxon women’s outfit. It will consist of a plain linen smock/chemise, a green wool gown with pale yellow silk trim, brown wool cloak, and white decorated veil. Due to the inclusion of silk and the color of the wool, and the planned embellishments on the veil, this outfit could have been worn by royalty, high noble status, or wealthy abbesses/nuns. It isn’t based on one specific illumination, but I have taken different image references from “Dress in Anglo-Saxon England” (drawn from sources such as contemporary religious texts and the Bayeux tapestry) and picked various elements as my inspiration. It won’t include heraldry or awards because I have none yet (joined just before all the covid cancellations). This is an outfit I’ve wanted to make for a while; I have a few normal “everyday” gowns that look nice, but I want something extra special to wear to court or have for big events.

Layer 1

This is the shift I’ll be wearing as my base layer for my 10th century female Anglo-Saxon outfit. I made it out of a medium weight linen; I prefer this weight over handkerchief linen because it doesn’t seem to cling to the body as much when it’s hot out. I hand sewed the entire shift, with backstitch in the higher stress areas and a running stitch everywhere else, then felled all the raw edges on the inside; the sewing is pretty much invisible on the exterior. The pattern is a simple T-tunic style, with underarm gussets and side gores, following the cutting example from “Dress in Anglo-Saxon England”. The sleeves are nearly a yard long, with extra fabric to bunch up along the forearm as seen in period artwork of women. It isn’t specified whether this was a style worn by all classes of people, or if it was a way to show how wealthy a person was to afford extra fabric, but in most of the artwork women and men of this period have pleats or bunching along their arms, so this is the style I’m going with. It’s a little awkward to put on as I have to bunch the sleeves before I can pull it over my head, but I love the finished look. The construction went as planned, but the one thing I would do differently next time is cut the sleeve looser right below the elbow. I tapered the width a bit too much so it’s a little tight once I push the extra fabric onto my arm. Hopefully as I wear it the linen loosens so it will be more comfortable. Overall, I’m pleased with how this came out and ready to work on the main gown!

Bonus Points

Advanced · Historic Advanced · Historically Focused

Agatha Wanderer

Location: Barony of Endewearde, East

Category/Level: Historically Focused/Advanced

About Agatha: I have been in the SCA for about 12 years. My expertise is in patterning/draping and sewing clothing, specifically 15th century Austrian/German garments. I specialize in underwear! This will be a stretch and a challenge, since it’s not my specialty, but I am excited for this!

Project Update Blog: Herrin der Nadel

Her Project: I plan to create a complete 16th century Trossfrau outfit to match the colors of my barony (I am the Baroness of my group). I will also be making a Landsknecht outfit for my husband. I don’t have any specific image yet.

Advanced · Historic Advanced · Historically Focused

Agnes von Heidelberg

Location: Barony of Coeur d’Ennui, Calontir

Category/Level: Historically Focused/Advanced

About Agnes: I’ve been in the SCA for more than a decade. I regularly hand sew almost all of the clothes my husband and I wear (I’m pretty sure my sewing machine is out to get me). I have made a number of Japanese outfits for both my husband and myself before. I will be dyeing most if not all of the fabric that will be used for this project and this will be the first time I have done this for a whole Japanese outfit. I have done single layers of Japanese items before and I have done the dyeing of all items for a Viking outfit before. I am actually making this as part of a pair of outfits but I am only entering the one outfit into the challenge. I will also be learning kumihimo for this project as it will be needed for the bag I plan to make. Some of the basic construction of kosode will be very easy for me as I have done it a number of times the challenge level will be in getting the dyeing, including shibori, done within the timeframe and learning a new skill, kumihimo. I do plan to start learning kumihimo before the official start date.

Her Project: The outfit will be for a Japanese woman, the style is seen in art ranging from the Kamakura era through the Muromachi and Momoyama periods (1185 – 1600). The primary imagery used will be Momoyama (1568 – 1600). There are several kosode (the period version of the kimono) layers as well as a final kosode that is worn over the head when walking out of the house. I will also be making a bag used for carrying things that can be seen in the art of the period. The most influential period image is from the folding screen found on this website

Historic Intermediate · Historically Focused · Intermediate

Alanna of Skye

Location: Carolingia, East

Category/Level: Historically Focused/Intermediate

About Alanna: I’ve been in the SCA for 20 years, mostly doing service things. I also do equestrian, thrown weapons, and archery. Nearly all of my sewing up til now has been by machine in straight lines (this is why early period is great) but I’ve made a decent amount that way. I enjoy embroidery and I’m working on improving my tablet weaving. I say my persona is 12th c English but realistically I think it’s turning into Norse cause it seems easier to make the complete picture look accurate. I’m doing this because I want to have garb that is as accurate as possible to level up my participation and this seemed like a good reason. This will be my first hand sewn garb and my first time constructing most of these pieces accurately. I’m also learning nalbinding for this project as I have never tried it before.

Her Project: My goal is to create a migration era Norse ensemble from the skin out, entirely sewn by hand. It will include an under tunic, serk, smokkr, and nalbinding mittens and socks. Other accessories will be made by friends, or possibly added to by me if I have extra time. This will be based off of extant finds, contemporary writings that describe the outfits, and visual representations from the period, mostly as interpreted by people with better research skills than me. I think this outfit would be worn by a woman of high status to a situation where many important people would see it to show off her wealth. I’ve been wanting to up my garb accuracy for awhile, and this will be the first time I work on a complete outfit for that goal.

Advanced · Historic Advanced · Historically Focused

Alexis MacAlister

Location: Barony of Marcaster, Trimaris

Category/Level: Historically Focused/Advanced

About Alexis: I joined the SCA in 1981. Pennsic X was my second event. My grandmother taught me to sew when I was young. I’m a Laurel in the SCA for Fiber Arts. This challenge ties directly into my persona.

Her Project: My goal is to create an early 16th C. Tudor ensemble for a middle-class seamstress. I have wanted to get back into early 16th C. clothing for a while, as it is my first love in historical period and clothing.

Historic Intermediate · Historically Focused · Intermediate

Ametrie of Vatavia

Location: Vatavia, Calontir

Category/Level: Historically Focused/Intermediate

About Ametrie : I’ve been in the SCA for about a year now, not as long as others have I’m sure. I mean, I’ve always known how to sew but I’ve recently been teaching myself more skills. I generally help others with other projects that they can’t talk on all on their own. I’ve been sticking with what I want my persona to be (I’m very indecisive) but I feel like this is a major part in who I am in life so yes, it does. This will be pretty challenging for me, it’s been a while since I’ve sewn and actually made a project out of it.

Her Project: My outfit is mainly focused around Hispanic women’s clothing dating back to the 16th century. The style is mostly higher class so a woman of higher standing (ex a duchess) would have worn such clothing. This piece in a way helps bring be closer to my heritage, I may not look it but I’m 1/3 Hispanic. This is something I’ve been wanting to do for a while but just never found time or motivation to finally try and make this beautiful outfit I have planned for you.

Historic Intermediate · Historically Focused · Intermediate

Annabelle Fitzsimmons

Location: Barony of Namron, Ansteorra

Category/Level: Historically Focused/Intermediate

About : I have been in the SCA for 40 years, and have sewn for even longer. However, I have only been trying to be more historically accurate for the last 10 or so years. I do mostly fiber arts, but am also interested in woodworking and scribal arts.

Project: This is for a 16th century Italian middle class/lower upper class woman. I am basing my outfit from a painting by Lorenzo Lotto. Portrait of a Woman inspired by Lucretia. This is an outfit that has intrigued me for years, so this may finally inspire me to try to create it.